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COL. 



Wellesley College News 

Entered u aecoml-claas matter Novcmbar 17, 1916. at the Poat OiTioe at Wei In. ley ItrHnch, Boston. Hui., under the art of March 8. lilt. 



VOL. XXIX. 



WKLLKSLEY, MASS., APRIL 20, 1921. 



No. 24 



WELLESLE1 ANSWERS 10091 IN 
UNDERGRADUATE DRIVE 



1 1 000 Pledged for Semi-Ce ntonnial 
Fund 



".No definite quota,— and $48,468.51 
Iged the tiist week of the cam- 
paign! That is a splendid recoiu 
which we can all be proud of," said 
Alice Joy, chairman of the undergrad- 
uate committee for the Semi-Centen- 
nial Fund. "It means that every stu- 
dent in college is back of the Alum- 
nae in their efforts to make the Semi- 
ennial Fund a reality." 

The pledgee which make up this 
total are as follows: 

1024 $14 009.00 

1923 8,265.52 

1922 15,03475 

1921 6,649.24 

1923 received the prize of $250 of- 
fered by Mr. Galen Stone for the first 
s whose subscribers were 100 9r of 
the class membership. This amount 
is in student pledges, and does not in- 
clude funds raised by other methods. 
The benefit performance of "Tho 
Tragedy of Nan" given in the Copley 
theater added $850 to the fund, and 
over $100 was made by Agora through 
selling food on the Wellesley Special. 
The proceeds fiom Tree Day, ard 
from a concert to be given by some 
well-known musician, will further in- 
crease the undergraduate contribu- 
tions. 

Meanwhile, various original means 
for making money are under way on 
campus. In Pomeroy. Marion Weil 
offers to do catering "for the Fund," 
with picnics or luncheons planned to 
suit your most exacting guest. In the 
Administration Building a tea-room 
has been established which offers you 
"your favorite kind of sandwiches, — 
no crusts." Across the hall the village 
seniors have made money from the 
curious minded by allowing them to 
hear their own voices proceed from 
a dictaphone, — for the sum of twenty- 
five cents. 

The undergraduate committee hopes 
that all students with clever and orig- 
inal ideas for making money will 
share their inspirations with some 
member of the committee. 



HOI SK PRESIDENTS 



Beebe — Luella Tucker 
Cazenove- Margaret Wylie 
Claflin— Dorothy Cochlin 
Fiske — Eugenia Bent 
Freeman — Elizabeth Ely 
Norumbega — Gertrude Wade 
Pomeroy — Caroline Ewe 
Shafer — Janet Ward 
Stone— Ruth McMillin 
Tower Court — Isabel Dietrich 
Wilder— Emily Latham 
Wood — Dorothy Wescott 



SECURITY LEAGUE OPENS 
ATTACK ON 
NEW LIBERAL CLUB 



DR. JOEL GOLDTHWAIT 
SPEAKS ON DRESS 



Branches To Be Established in Op- 
position to Intercollegiate 
Liberal Organizations 



Physical Director of Smith College 

Urges Health Through Proper 

Clothing 



The National Security League has 
recently announced a nation-wide ef- 
fort to off-set the influence of liberal 
or radical organization in the various 
American colleges and universities. 
Their campus is aimed specifically 
against the Intercollegiate Socialistic 
Society and the only recently formed 
Intercollegiate Liberal League. Their 
attack will come from new societies 
which will be established at once to 
combat openly the liberal and radical 
tendencies within colleges and univer- 
sities. 

The basic ideas of these new soci- 
eties, as stated, is "to stimulate pa- 
triotic spirit and knowledge and re- 
spect for American institutions among 
undergraduates and to give non-rad- 
ical students an opportunity for active 
expiession." 

The National Security League feels 
that thev have sensed a real danger 
to their country in college societies 
such as the Liberal League which it 
accuses of being a socialistic organi- 
zation in disguise. Circulars and 
newspaper articles issuing counter 
propoganda have been distributed 
throughout the country. 

The Liberal League has refused to 
reply to the accusations of the oppos- 



Dr. Joel Goldthwait of Boston spoke 
on posture and its relation to modern 
dress, at C. A., Wednesday evening, 
April 13. His chief argument was 
against the kind of costume which 
tries to mold humanity into a new 
pattern, and which thereby under- 
mines health and prevents an erect 
carriage. 

Dr. Goldthwait, during the war, 
was often called Chief Salvager of 
Derelicts. The derelicts were human: 
he salvaged them by teaching them 
correct posture and the right way to 
walk. By putting this knowledge irjo 
practice, those men doubled their vi- 
tality and usefulness in such a way 
that they could stand the stress of 
war. 

The same principle applies to col- 
lege girls. The once-popular "debu- 
tante slouch" and its accompanying 
awkward walk are neither hygienic 
uor beautiful. The clothes in vogue 
at the time caused this slouch and 
such clothing which cramps and de 
forms the body should never be worn. 
Dr. Goldthwait by no means advised 
severe and puritanical garments, but 
urged, rather, grace and beauty. As 
he repeatedly said, the "splendidly 
erect" carriage, which lends health, 
beauty, and dignity, is eminently to 



(Continuc-d on page 6, col. 4) 



(Continued on page 4, col. 4) 



PHI BETA KAPPA 



VILLAGE SENIORS 



Eleanor Burch 
Inez Cohen 
Isabel Faye 

Virginia French 
Margaret Haddock 
Ada Haeseler 
Alida Herling 
Marguciite Jackson 
Hope Mathewson 

d McKearin 
Phoebe Ann Richmond 
Olive Snow 
Elizabeth K. Say re 
Esther Stevens 
Virginia Travell 



Birches — Carol Roehm 
CHnton — Dorothy Blossom 
Crofton — Dorothy Muzzey 
Eliot — Pauline Coburn 
Elms — Ernestine Wiedenbach 
Lei^hton — Madeline Van Dorn 
Little — Harriet Rathbun 
Lovewell — Ruth Hillyar 
Noanett — Tacy Parry 
Townsend — Josephine Vincent 
Washington — Margaret By ard 
Webb — Katharine Cooke 
11 Abbott St.— Mary GiddingS 
18 Belair Rd. — Madeleine Pritzlaff 
7 Waban St.— Helen Yates 
Mrs. Nye's — Elizabeth Willcox 



WESTERN UNION TELEGRAM 

New York, April 13, 1921. 

Enthusiastic congratulal tudent body from Headquarters 

upon the heart-warmintr results of recent drive. 

Louise Bascom Barratt. 



PROF. MACDOUGALL CAMPAIGNS 

FOR WELLESLEY 



Tours South and West Speaking 
for Fund 



"The present business depression, 

the call of local and state charities, 
and ignorance of what Wellesley 
stands for, were the greatest obsta 
I met in my trip through the South 
and West," said Professor Hamilton 
C. Macdougall, in speaking of his re- 
cent trip as a member of the General 
Campaign Committee. 

Professor Macdougall was sent by 
Fund Headquarters to speak to school 
children, to interview business men, 
and to bring news of the college to 
alumnae in Indianapolis, Louisville, 
St. Louis, Kansas City, Wichita, Oma- 
ha, Cedar Rapids, Chicago, and De- 
troit. He was gone seventeen days, 
travelled 3900 miles, spoke to 7300 
preparatory school students, gave 
five organ recitals, and attended 'in- 
numerable dinners and luncheons." In 
each city. Professor Macdougall was 
met by a group of Wellesley alumnae 
who had made plans for his enter- 
tainment and for various speeches and 
recitals. 

"The wide-awake earnestness of 
our graduates, and the representative 
places they hold in their commune 
were an inspiration," said Professor 
Macdougall. 'The 'typical Wellesley 
girl,' if I may judge from thehundreds 
of graduates I met. is all one could 
wish." 

Professor Macdoucall said that the 
alumnae expressed concern regarding 
the new comprehensive examinations, 
for they feared that the average girl 
would be discouraged, and that the 
Wellesley type might become too aca- 
demic. "I do not discount academic 
ability in any way," continued Pro- 
fessor Macdougall, "but after all, as 
Lincoln said, 'God must have loved the 
common people, he made so many of 
them.' Just so, there are many fine 
girls of only average academic abil- 
ity, who could give and gain a great 
deal at Wellesley. I sympathize with 
the alumnae in their fears that we 
may exclude much valuable material 
by the adoption of too rigid entrance 
requirements." 

(Continued on page I. col. l) 



TICKETS FOR OPERE'IT\ 



ets will be on sale for On* 
on Monday. Tuesday, and \\< dn 
April 2,">. 26, and 27. Op< 
will be sold the 27th and 28th. Tl 
who have not ticket- for Miss Edith 
Wynne Matthison's program on Fri- 
day evening, April 29, are requc 
to iro to the Operetta that nitrht. This 
will insure room for those who v 
to hear Mi- Matthison on Friday, and 
to attend Operetta on Saturday. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



WtUt&kp College JSetos 



ree rress 



Col 



umn 



EDITOR IN CHIEF 
ELIZABETH M. WOODY, 1922 
Associate Editors 
BEATRICE JEFFERSON, 1922 
DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS, 1922 

Assistant Editors 
DOROTHEA COMLY, 1922 
MARGARET WATTERSON, 1922 
ELIZABETH ALLEN, 1923 
MARGARET HOOGS, 1923 
ELIZABETH SANFORD, 1923 
HELEN STAHL. 1923 
DANE VERMILION, 1923 
LOUISE CHILD, 1924 
BARBARA CONGER, 1924 
RUTH HELLER, 1924 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
SUSAN GRAFF AM, 1922 

Circulation Manager 
BARBARA BATES, 1922 

Assistant Circulation Manager 
LUCY JOHNSON, 1923 

Advertising Manager 
RUTH WHITE, 1923 

Assistant Managers 
MAY FALES, 1924 
ANNETTE WRIGHT, 1924 



A COMMUNICATION FROM DR. 
HOWE 



_,_ Published weekly during the college year by a board of students of Wellesley College. 
Subscriptions one dollar and seventy-five cents per annum in advance. Single copies six 
cents each. All contributions should be in the News office by 9 P. M. on Sunday at the 
latest and should be addressed to Miss E. M. Woody. All Alumnae news should b« sent to 
Miss Laura Dwight, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. All business communications and 
subscriptions should be sent to the Wellesley Colleg'e NewB, Wellesley, Mass. 

Entered as second-class matter, October 10, 1919, at the Post Office at Wellesley Branch. 
Boston, Mass., under the Act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special r»U of 
postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917. authorized October 80. 1919. 

MAUGUS PRESS, PRINTERS. WELLESLEY, MASS. 



VILLAGE SENIORS AND 1922 



Another group of Wellesley Juniors 
"has been chosen to go to the village 
to help next year's freshmen adjust 
themselves to their new college world 
with a minimum of painful uncertain- 
ty. It is an opportunity for real help- 
fulness, no less real because "the 
house by the side of the road" 
chances to be beside the familiar 
Weston Road, or because, when one 
aspires to be "a friend to man," the 
beneficiary boasts the prefix "fresh." 

The News congratulates the college 
upon its choice, and Adonais promises 
faithfully that he will accompany the 
village seniors on their long walk to 
campus, giving his utmost of canine 
cooperation. 



HALOS AND VILLAGE SENIORS 



Village Needs Spirit of Comaraderie 
Rather Than Hero- Worship 



During- the past three years the col- 
lege has been awakened to the face 
that the village presents a serious 
problem, and it has attempted, by 
public debate and private discussion, 
to deal with the situation adequately. 
The result has been that the majority 
of undergraduates have expressed 
themselves as being in favor of con- 
tinuing to have seniors in village 
houses; and the members of 1922 who 
are to carry on the difficult task of 
Bupplying the missing link between 
campus and the village have been ap- 
pointed. The warring factions are no 
longer debating as to whether seniors 
or are not necessary in the village; 
the decision has been made, and Wel- 
V undergraduates have a suffi- 
cient respect for law to abide by the 
vote of the majority. But past dis- 
lion has left its stamp on the col- 
lege consciousness, and the village 
seniors must realize that they will be 
under constant criticism, not unkindly, 
but very searching. 

enior, in addition to be- 

the tangible outpost of college 

ment, represents also the less 



tangible spirit of college. She stands 
to the freshmen for the ideal Welles- 
ley girl. At first they do homage to 
the symbol, without stopping to con- 
sider whether or not the individual is 
herself worthy of their admiration; 
she is an awesome figure, for whose 
entrance one jumps up and at whose 
exit one sits down. Later, however, 
when some of the awe attendant upon 
their introduction to a strange envii- 
onment has abated, they desire a vil- 
lage senior who may be approached 
with camaraderie, rather than with 
obeisances. Would it not eliminate 
much painful readjustment on both 
sides if the seniors attempted from 
the first to do away with the aureole 
cast by cap and gown, and appeared 
before the freshmen as mere under- 
raduates, with no extraordinary en- 
dowments of sagacity or omniscience ? 
After all, they have no particular 
claim to freshmen veneration except 
a three years' residence in college, 
which has naturally supplied them 
with a more extensive knowledge of 
college routine and customs than that 
enjoyed by the incoming class. 

Lest the criticism be made that the 
News indulges only in sweeping gen- 
eralities, we suggest a few concrete 
means whereby the seniors may dis- 
courage adoration arid foster a sane 
attitude of comradeship toward them- 
selves. 

1. Insistence from the start, up- 
on being called by one's first name, 
with no gratifying "Miss" attached. 

2. Discouragement of the usual 
freshman habit of standing up at 
the entrance of a senior. 

3. Care with regard to the in- 
formation given to freshmen, in or- 
der that it may not be tinged with 
one's personal prejudices, acquired 
during three years of college life. 

4. Determination to keep out of 
freshmen's personal problems as 
far as possible. 

5. Recognition that freshmen are 
free moral agents, endowed with an 
average brain capacity, capable and 
desirous of seeing college through 
I heir own eyes. 



It is not infrequently believed, on a 
priori grounds, that, in a large lec- 
ture course, correct determination of 
grades is impossible. It is easy to 
understand how reasonable, and to-be- 
taken-for-granted this opinion seems 
to those who have no opportunity for 
viewing and knowing the entire situ- 
ation in detail. 

In courtesy to the students inter- 
ested and for their information, the 
following statements are made. , The 
data are not selected, but are simply 
all that happen to be on hand. 

A. Relation of Grades to Probation 
List 

1. In February, 1921, of all stu- 
dents who received E or less in re- 
quired Hygiene, 54% were on proba- 
tion. Of all students in the course 
who were on probation, 86% received 
D or less. 

2. In February, 1917, of those re- 
ceiving 

Grade in req'd Math. 

A 3% 

B 3% 

C 6% 

D 27% 

E or less 66% 

Grade in req'd Eng. in req'd Hyg. 
A 6% 0% 

B 4% 3% 

C ' 7% 11% 

D 32% 23% 

E or less 53% 62% 

were on probation. 

3. In November, 1914, 26% of 
those who received D and 62% of 
those who received E or less in re- 
quired Hygiene were on probation. 

It is evident that there is no dif- 
ference between the lecture course 
and the recitation courses, in the ac- 
curacy of grading, as far as is shown 
by the absence of high grade students 
and the presence of low grade stu- 
dents on the probation list. 

B. Correlations. 

For the year 1918-1919, the correla- 
tions have been calculated between 
the freshmen students' general aca- 
demic average and their grades in the 
three required freshman subjects, re- 
spectively. 

General average and Mathematics — 
0.64. 

General average and Hygiene — 
0.59. 

General average and English Comp. 
—0.49. 

For the non-mathematical it may 
be said in explanation that the cor- 
relation coefficient measures the ten- 
dency, among a large group, for those 
having high grades in one line to have 
high grades in others, and vice versa. 
If all students with A in Hygiene had 
a general academic average of 90%, 
or better; all those with B, a general 
average between 80 and 89; all those 
with C, a general average between 70 
and 79; etc., — trvm correlation between 
Hygiene grades and general averages 
would be perfect, and the correlation 
coefficient, unity (1.00). If there were 
no regular relation between the 
grades in one subject and the average 



grades in all subjects, correlation 
would be nil, and the correlation co- 
efficient, zero (0.00). 

C. The number of failures in re 
quired Hygiene in Feb. 1921, would 
correspond to a little less than four 
out of a class of thirty. 

D. There can be no question, on 
general educational grounds, about 
the superiority of the small recitation 
class over the lecture. 

E. In the seven years since the 
writer was drafted to conduct the 
course in Hygiene, he has given 780 
lectures and read between six and sev- 
en thousand final examination papers. 
He is in a position, therefore, to be 
able to appreciate vividly, the "disad- 
vantages of the large lecture course." 
One of the unnecessary obstacles in 
the conduct of such a course is the 
opinion, entertained by the few who 
have not yet reached the stage of ex- 
amining evidence before pronouncing 
judgment, that the grades are neces- 
sarily fortuitously assigned. It is to 
be hoped that the above figures will 
once and for all lay this tradition 
to rest and that the person to whom 
the course is gratefully surrendered 
will not be hampered by it. On mat- 
ters of real importance, such as co- 
operation for higher academic and 
health standards, the department has, 
and will always, welcome suggestions 
which are conceived in good spirit, 
and carefully and intelligently formu- 
lated. 

Eugene C. Howe. 



JEWELS UNNECESSARY 



In an editorial in last week's News 
an effort was made to reconcile the 
discrepancy between the academic 
standard required for society member- 
ship and that required for major col- 
lege offices. The writer suggested 
that the standard of the latter may be 
raised to coincide with that of society 
eligibility. 

There is, however, such a great dif- 
ference between the bases of the two 
positions — society members and major 
office holder — that an attempt to make 
them both equal in the eyes of the 
community is unreasonable. Society- 
membership is a privilege, arfl offers 
enjoyment to the individual. Office- 
holding is no less a privilege in one 
sense of the word, but its ultimate 
aim is service, not personal pleasure. 

Restricting society membership on 
academic grounds does not hinder the 
development of college institutions. 
Restricting the choice of officers on 
academic grounds any more strictly 
than it is at present might do so. The 
problem of obtaining capable girls 
for the different positions in college is 
one that often puzzles the student 
body now. Why, then, further con 
fuse elections by placing an arbitrary 
standard on the nominees merely be- 
cause the same restriction is Imposed 
on society members? 

"Consistency, thou art a jewel" — 
but don't iewels seem a hit unneces- 
sary when we face the question of 
getting the right girl in the place. 
Let's not make her any more difficult 
to get than she already is! 

M. '21 



THE WKLLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



Blouses, 

Suits, Gowns, 

Skirts, Coats, 

Sweaters, 
Silk Petticoats 

and Furs. 

Meyer Jonasson & Co. 

JSOSTOIV 

Tremont and Boylston 5>*t s*. 




ROUSE SUGGESTS PEN VLTY 
FOR SMOKING 



COLLEGE NOTES 



"Campasing" to be Put into Effect 



On Thursday. April 14, the House 
of Representatives met to reconsider 
the penalty for smoking. The amount 
of criticism of the wide gap between 
six weeks' probation for a first of- 
fence and suspension or expulsion for 
subsequent offenses prompted many 
suggestions. The motion finally ac- 
cepted was that first offenders should 
be "campused" for six weeks. This 
means that henceforth those found 
guilty of smoking will suffer the pen- 
alty of being limited to the campus 
for six weeks, and having to register 
each night to the effect that they had 
obeyed the rule during that day. Hew 
the freshmen would suffer under this 
rule was at first undetermined, but it 
was at last decided that they should 
be obliged to go back and forth '.o 
camups daily along an undeviating 
path, entering no building by the 
way, for the same length of time. 

N'o provision was made for a sec- 
ond offense, this punishment being 
deemed sufficient to preclude such a 
contingency. 



OM.V THREE APPOINTMENTS 

MORE 



Mi" Mabel Gair Curtis of the 
Women's Educational and Industrial 
T'nion, and Vocational Adviser to stu- 
dents in Wellesley College, will make 
only three more visits, one in April 
and two in May. The notice in re 
to these special dates will be p* 
as early as possible. There mu-t 
be many who are intending to consult 
this word of remind 
er will be appreciated. 



The Commissioner of Education for 
Porto Lico reports that more teach- 
the United States are need- 
ed for the public schools. An 
interested should address Mr. William 
Lay Pai \ssistant to the Chief 

of Bureau, Bureau of Insular Affairs, 
War Department, Washington, D. ('. 



The Forum is planning to have a 
dinner on April 18 to welcome the 
pew members from the freshman 
class. 

The debating teams and critics had 
a shore party over the last week-end 
at the Whitney Homestead at .Va- 
liant. 

The Wellesley Alumnae at Milton. 
Massachusetts, are planning to give 
a rummage sal'.' for the benefit of the 
Fund. 



ENGAGED 



'22 Use Gehring, to Charles Reed 
'20 Katherine Taylor, to John 
( 'ha lies Shroeder. 



MARRIED 



'22 Sally Yost, to Charles Wir- 
grath, Jr., of Jamaica, N. Y.. on April 
0. 



HEAR HEAR HEAR HEAR HEAR 

ROOM 49, BULGES WITH MSS. 

THE MAGAZINE ENTREATS 

THAT YOU COME AND 

TAKE AWAY 

YOUR PRECIOUS MSS. 

They are all in the closet waiting 
for their fond parents. 

ANDREW J. LLOYD CO. 

The Andrew J. Lloyd Company store 
at 75 Summer Street, Boston, is very 
conveniently located for Wellesley Col- 
students. At this store you will 
find all sorts of eyeglasses and spec- 
ks, especially the student's shell 
tacles, kodaks, films, developing 
and printing, student's fountain pens, 
pencils especially the kind with the 
ring to be worn with a cord or ribbon, 
i, in fact, everything in 
th< optical line. Other stores at 816 
Washington Street. 10T) Tremont 
Street, 310 Boylston Street. Adv. 



CIRCULO CASTELLANO 
GIVES SPANISH PLAY. 



Benavente's fairy story "El Prin- 
cipe Que Todo Lo Apprendio En Lib 
ros" was given by students of Span- 
ish at Wellesley, in the Barn, Satur- 
day evening, April lfi. Elizabeth 
Couch, president of Circulo Cas- 
tellano, and manager of the play, ex- 
plained that while most of us are 
familiar with Benavente's more pas- 
sionate and morbid drama, he has also 
written many fairy-tale plays, de- 
sened for the Children's Theater in 
Madrid, of which this is one of the 
most charming. She also read a res- 
ume of the plot in English for the 
benefit of those in the audience who 
could not understand the Spanish. Be- 
fore the play, Spanish music, both pi- 
ano and singing, was given by Sr. D. 
Ramon Ricalde and Sr. D. Jesus 
Sanroma, of the New England Con- 
servatory of Music 

The story is an allegory, showing 
how the realities of life are quite con- 
trary to fairy-tales, but are neverthe- 
less beautiful in themselves. In the 
first scene, the Prince, who knows 
everything about fairy-lore, but noth- 
ing at all about real life, is bidding 
farewell to his royal parents and, pro- 
vided with plenty of clean pocket- 
handkerchiefs, is starting forth to 
seek his fortune in the real world, ac- 
companied by his tutor and the clown 
Tonino. In the course of his wander- 
ings, most of his illusions gained from 
fairy-tales are dispelled. Instead of 
triumphantly killing the wicked Ogre, 
he is overcome by him, and has to be 
saved by the good fairy whom he 
meets. Instead of the youngest prin- 
cess being the most beautiful and vii 
tuous, she turns out to be selfish and 
cruel, and it is the middle one with 
whom he lives happily ever after 

Helen Gary, as Tonino and Ethel 
Quinn as the first Princess did some 
good characterization in their parts; 
and as a whole, considering the short 
time allowed for rehearsing the play, 
the added difficulty of iearning parts 
in a foreign language, and, as always, 



the limited facilities of the Barn, the 
girls deserve much credit for ach 
ing so effective b performance. Much 
i also owed to the coaching of M 
Paloma and Mi* Coe, of the sp:. 
Department. 
The cast, in order of appearand 

as follows: 

The King Ei telle Alcaide '2.". 

The Queen Thelma Bowman '21 

The Prince ma Couch '22 

Pages Mildred Ascheim '21 

Elizabeth Couch '21 

Leah Babbitt '22 
The Tutor Hope Angleman '22 

Bella, wife of the Ogre, 

Loraine Callan '21 
The Good Fairy, alias an old woman, 

Dorothy Holmes '22 
Woodcutters Ruth Dean '22 

Helen Kerwin '22 
The Ogre Carol Roehm '22 

First Princess Ethel Quinn '22 

Second Princess Ruth Sheppard '22 
Third Princess. 

Georgiana Lockwood '23 
The King Churchurumbe, 

Ida Waterman '23 
Committees 
Elizabeth Couch — Manager 
Chairman of Costumes Ruth May 
Chairman of Properties Mary Dudley 
Chairman of Lighting. 

Elizabeth Hubbard 
Chairman of Scenery. 

Elizabeth Couch 
Chairman of Ushering 

and Programmes Mabel Hunt 

Coach Miss Paloma 

E. A. '23 



FORMER MEMBERS OF 1921 



1921's class supper committee under 
the chairmanship of Elizabeth Sa; 
has already commenced its momentous 
operation. It can do little with the 
seating, however, until it hears from 
those former members who plan to 
join in this final meeting. Those who 
are gone, but have no wish to be for- 
gotten the last evening, should com- 
municate with Mary C. Boswoith. 
Beebe Hall, Ik f<re the end of April. 



HATS 



Our new Spring hats, in all the 
straws and silks in fashion this sea- 
are ready for you, in your choice 

of style and color, at low cost. 

Come in the next time you are in 

town. 



BOSTON 

Sixty-five — Sixty-nine Summer Street 



4 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



Prof. Macdougall Campaigns for 
Wellesley 



(Continued from page 1, col. 4) 



will have a chance to carry the work 
still further, and Prof. Macdougall 
feels confident that they will make 
the most of the opportunity to help. 



Professor Macdougall interviewed 
many prominent business men in be- 
half of the Semi-Centennial Fund. In 
almost every case he met with un- 
failing courtesy, but the men had al- 
ready contributed largely to local 
charities and did not wish to contri- 
bute to an Eastern college about 
which they knew little. "We are 
prone to think that Wellesley is well- 
known nationally, because seventy per 
cent of Wellesley students live out- 
side New England," Professor Mac- 
dougall said, "but a few encounters 
with alert business men to whom Wel- 
lesley is only a name would teach us 
that Wellesley has a great deal of 
work to do before it becomes the na- 
tional institution it deserves to be." 
One graduate has suggested that a 
representative Southerner and a 
Westerner, placed on the Board of 
Trustees, would destroy any miscon- 
ception that Wellesley is run by New 
Englanders in an exclusively Eastern 
manner. 

The trip did not result in many 
large contributions, but a foundation 
for further work was laid, and Wel- 
lesley was introduced to many people. 
In speaking to schools. Professor Mac- 
dougall laid stress on Wellesley's dis- 
tinctive qualities, the beauty of its 
surroundings, and its nearness to a 
large city which is also a cultural and 
educational center. In several speeches 
he conducted a typical freshman 
through the first week of college. 

Gratifying interest was expressed 
by many persons, and inquiries for 
more accounts of Wellesley were in 
order after each address. Prof. Mac 
dougal) has started a wave of interest, 
in Wellesley in each of the cities he 
visited. During the next summer the 
undergraduate body of the college 

YOU HAVE WRITTEN POEMS! 

Do you care to have them revised or 
constructively criticised by successful 
authors? If you do, then send us your 
manuscript (stories, articles or po- 
ems). We will criticise, and place 
them should they prove to be accept- 
able for publication. 

There is no actual charge for our 
services. If, however, you have not 
previously enrolled with the advisory 
lepartment of this association, we re- 
quest that you enclose the initial fee 
of two dollars, which we must ask of 
each new contributor There is no 
additional expense, no future obliga- 
tion. 

It must be realized that we can only 

be of aid to those of serious intent. If 

i do mean to strive for literary suc- 

. ess, we can help you in many ways. 

Our services are yours until we have 

ually succeeded in marketing at 

least one of your manuscripts. Send 

ething today! 

Please enclose return postage with 

r communications. 

NATIONAL LITERARY 

ASSOCIATION 

131 W. 39th St. 

New York City 

Vlvi Department 



OUR SISTER COLLEGti lN 

PEKING HELPS 

FAMINE SUFFERERS 



DR. KIRSOPP LAKE, GREAT 
AUTHORITY ON NEW TESTA- 
MENT SPEAKS AT SUNDAY 
CHAPEL 



The Yenching college girls made 
$1500 by a public performance of 
"The Bluebird" in Chinese for the 
benefit of famine sufferers, and feel- 
ing that they wanted to contribute 
m ore than money, they asked permis- 
sion at Christmas time for a deputp 
tion of two, with a member of the 
faculty, to go down into the famine 
district to investigate for themselves. 
At Wangdoo, just on the edge and ac- 
cessible to the famine area, they 
found an official who begged them to 
come and use a large temple with all 
its courtyards and adjoining buildings, 
as a famine lefuge. It could accom- 
modate 200 girls. On reporting this 
to the students at college, they voted 
to ask the faculty's permission to run 
this refuge for girls who would other- 
wise die of starvation. They planned 
that one of the older and more mature 
students should give up her second 
semester's work, and act as the head 
resident worker at Wangdoo, other 
girls going down for two weeks or 
more at a time to help. 

All of the work has been well or- 
ganized and the famine girls are giv- 
en a classroom instruction for half 
the day, and taught industrial work 
the other half. The making of hair. 
. nets is the first trade taught. They 
hope to keep the girls there until the 
wheat harvest in June. Think what 
it must mean to these starved children 
to have the chance to learn and work 
with college girls, who have gone 
down to Wangdoo to give themselves 
as well as their money to help the 
suffering. 

The refuge conducted by Wellesley's 
younger sisters is the first enterprise 
which any Chinese women have under- 
taken, financed, and administered 
themselves in a time of emergency 
without foreign supervision. We for- 
eign teachers haven't a thing to do 
with the work, and have given a little 
advice, but nothing else. The girls 
go to the Refuge in teams, and are 
away from the College for two or 
three weeks at a time, and when they 
come back, they make up their aca- 
demic arrears. 

Grace Boynton '12. 

NAVY BLUE 

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FOR GIRLS 

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Same as U. S. Navy 
All wool flannel or 
serge $5.09 

Neckerchiefs or Ties $2 

We make skirts to match 

/r \ / 7 [ \ the blouses. Rating or 

l^lm I \ En "blem 80c 

'•*" White Blouses 2.80 

Blue Linen Middy Suits 

$12 
Mail Orders Filled to 
All parts of the U. S. 

Send for 

measurement blank. 

Money refunded 

if unsatisfactory. 

ARLINGTON UNIFORM CO, 

Box 21 Arlington Heights, Mass. 



'Four hundred years ago, Martin 
Luther settled the fate of Europe," 
said Dr. Kirsopp Lake of Harvard in 
his address at Houghton Memorial 
Chapel, on Sunday, April 17. Dr. 
Lake, who is the greatest New Testa- 
ment scholar in the country, drew a 
parallel between the difficulties aris- 
ing from Luther's destruction of the 
good as well as the evil in the Catholic 
system, and the present situation oi 
the world. 

"The confessional," said Dr. Lake, 
"was the right system applied to tht 
wrong people. In doing away with the 
confessional Luther broke down the 
method of discipline which makes the 
Catholic Church mean so much to 
those who are spiritually sick. Can- 
not we do something to bring back 
the good of that svstem to the Prot- 
estant Church?" 

Luther also broke down the unity of 
Europe, for, by turning to the princes, 
he established the principle that the 



final unit of life is to be the nation, a 
unit which is local and which calls for 
loyalty to itself as against the rest 
of humanity. 

"The Catholic Church at its best 
appealed to man's sense of right and 
wrong as a force superior to all na 
tions." Dr. Lake pointed out how the 
view held by Erasmus and John Colet, 
the founders of St. Pauls School, of 
reform through education avoided this 
evil of Luther's teaching. "The re- 
sponsibility has come down to you,'' 
he said. "Remember that the only 
reason why it is worth while for us 
to be educated is that we may be 
leaders. This world should keep tht 
high ideals which it already has and 
should add to them what it does not 
have, accurate knowledge on all sub- 
jects." 

Dr. Goldthwait Speaks On Dress 




(Continued from page 1, col. 3) 

bs desired, and only such costumes as 
permit it should be worn. 

It is, in large part, the college girls 
who set the style. We should exert 
our influence for the right kind of 
dress. 



S. Altaian $c Ota 



NEW YORK 



will hold an interesting 



FASHION 



EXHIBIT 



at the Wellesley Inn 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 

On Friday and Saturday 

April 22nd and 23d 

Misses and Young Women's 

Frocks, Suits, Coats, Hats, Blouses and all the essentials 
of dress, for the Spring and Summer seasons, are includ- 
ed in the assortments. 

INSPECTION IS CORDIALLY INVITED 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



6 



Treo ( lirdles and 

Fine Corsets and Brassieres 

Carefully Fitted 
.it 

Madame Whitney's 

Up One Flight The Wnban Bldft. 
Wellesley Square. 

Fine Hosiery, Lovely (.'ami- 
soles. Chemises, Bloomers 
and Gowns. Dainty Gift 
Novelties 

Come in and see our selections of 
ATTRACTIVE MERCHANDISE 



Look for the Blue Sign 

WELLESLEV TEA ROOM and FOOD SHOP 

ALICE G. COOMBS, '93 

GRACE I. COOMBS, '94 
Wellesley Square, Over Post Off. TeL 

Dr. Chas. A. DRAPER 

FOOT SPECIALIST 

ORTHOPEDIC CHIROPODIST 

ALL FOOT AILMENTS 
SCIENTIFICALLY TREATED 

Suite 414, Huntington Chambers 
Copley Sq., Boston 

Near Back Bay Station 
Phone B. B. 839. 



TAXI SERVICE 

Baggage Transfer 



Perkins Garage 

SUMNER FROST, Proprietor 



69 Central St, Wellesley, Mass. 

Telephone 
Wellesley 409 

GARS STORED. Let us store 

your car for you in our new 

modern Garage. Cart washed 
and polished. 




THE- PARLIAMENT* OF- FOOLS 



As Browning might have remarked 
had he been caught in the Wellealey 
1 lizzard last Monday afternoon, ''Oh, 
to be in England now that April's 
here!" Rumor has it that on above 
date a winter carnival, distinguished 
by Esquimo frolics and bicycle riding, 
where the snow was not too deep, was 
participated in by young and old. A 
good time was had by all, who re- 
turned home tired but happy. 

Praxitiles: What is a porte coch- 
ere? A breakfast food? 

Donatello: No my friend, en entree. 



Dwo Dooms Under Dooly Dynasty 

(tempus competitionis) 
Doo late one Duesday afternoon, 
Dwo damsels, dawdling coolly, 
From vill mail drew assignments due, 

Signed, duely, "truely, Dooly." 
'"Due Duesday," drawled the droop- 
ing dwo, 
"Now sinks the Duesday sun. 
The Dews will have to do without 

The dope we haven't done." 
But Adonais duty did — 

He dogged them to their room 
And told the Dews what dolts they 
were, 
. . . . And Dooly sealed their 
doom. 



A member of the Sophomore Bible 
Class was heard to inquire from the 
Self Help Bureau if the Book of Job 
would assist her in getting a position. 
They hastily referred her to Exoduc. 



I. C. S. A. (Icy Essay) 



If you cannot get A B. A., 
B. A. member of the C. A., 

C. A. letter on your sweater, 
Then you will B. long 2 A. A. 
If you do not get 2 Z. A., 
A. A., C. A., or 2 B. A., 
T'wiM win my alpha-bet, 
Should U ever B. A. M-A. 



Canoe(s) Editor ever have a row 
with the dummy, oar does the sale 
make the Business Board ? 



Mid and Maude 

Lived in the Quad 

And both were energetic. 

Maude and Mid 

Did what they did 

To make this place athletic. 



We Have Photographs of 

MISS PENDLETON MISS BATES 

MISS SHERWOOD PROF. HAMILTON 

MISS SHACKFORD PROF. MACDOUGAL 



FACULTY PLAY COLLEGE BUILDINGS 

20' I of all proceeds will be given to Fund 

SUE RICE STUDIO 

10 Grove St. 



Where did we hear that B pretzel 
was a doughnut with the cramps — or 
that Infinity was nothing but a dead 
eight? 



Reports from the Chemistry Lab. 
have come in as follows: 

The lighting of a combination of 
hydrogen an 1 oxygen, which cause a 
tremendous explosion, outrht to be 
performed only under a competent 
instructor. We would suggest, if any, 
an incompetent one. 

Also this: 

There liveth a lad named Ben Zine 

Whose mission in life is to clean. 

But with C 6 H6 

His enemies mix 

This fellow, and call him Ben Zene. 



A FEW SERIOUS WORDS 



As you have indubitably observed, 
Oh most erudite and profound of 
readers of this column, that said col- 
umn has changed both in plan ard 
nature. It has cast off its guise of 
rah-rah ism and aims to emulate 
those paragons of humor, the Sundial, 
The Conning Tower and The Bowling 
Green. But even these columns could 
not long remain pillars of facetious- 
ness were it not for the loyal support 
and countless contributions of its 
scribbling public. Therefore we ap- 
peal to you, Oh Literary Ones, that 
even as you read as you run so you 
will write as you read and enrich this 
page with your innate wit. Kindly 
leave all contributions i nthe Dugout 
(News Office) and oblige. 

Adonais. 



S5 OFFERED FOR CUT 



Try Your Artistic Ingenuity 
The News offers a prize of $5 for 
the best design for a Parliament of 
Fools cut. The proportions of the 
headpiece should be approximately 3 
to 1 while those of the tailpiece are 
not specified. 

The contributions will be judged on 
the merits of originality and appro- 
priateness. The competition will close 
on May first. 

All contributions should be left in 
the News office. 




ECONOMY 

Let B. L. KARTT. the Local Tailor, do your 

TAILORING. CLEANING, PRESSING 

Workmanship and Satisfaction Always 

Guaranteed 

PRICES MODERATE 

B. L. KARTT 

Tailor and Farrier 

Wellesley Sq.. Opp. Post Off. Tel. WeL 21T-R 



DR. EBEN MOORE FLAGG 

ORTHODONTIST 

558 Washington St, Wellesley 

Office Hours, 9 a. m. - 12 m. 2 - 5 p. m. 

Graduae of New York School of 

DENTISTRY 
Telephone, Wellesley 471-M. 



H. L. FLAGG 

Company 

WATERMAN 

and MOORE'S 

FOUNTAIN 

PENS 

PHONOGRAPH RECORDS and 
NEEDLES, EATON, CRANE & 
PIKE CO'S FINE STATION- 
ERY, WRIGHT & DITSON'S 
ATHLETIC GOODS MAGA- 
ZINES, NEWSPAPERS, DE- 
VELOPING AND PRINTING 
FILMS, DYE STAMPING, 
CARD ENGRAVING, CHRIST- 
MAS CARDS 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 

PHONE 51330 



"Great oaks from little acorns grow" The dollars from these soap cakes flow 

for 

THE WELLESLEY SEMI- CENTENNIAL FUND 

ACORN SOAP 

.lave you a cake of Acorn soap in your room? 
It not only floats but it iasts. Wonderful for your complexion. 

Watch it lather in hard water. Don't go to the village for your soap, 

lome to the Alumnae Office and get 



ACORN SOAP 



2 cakes 2V. 



cakes $1.00. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



FINAL BASEBALL GAME GIVES 
8-7 VICTORY FOR '21 



Two Old English W's Awarded 



The senior-junior indoor baseball 
game, played Saturday afternoon, 
April 16th, in the gymnasium, was 
above the average for speed and ex- 
citement. Heavy batting and an apt- 
ness for "sliding home" on the seniors' 
part, versus a superior sprinting abil- 
ity on the part of the juniors, kept the 
play fairly balanced. 

'21 began the scoring in the first 
inning when Helen Sherman and then 
Virginia Travell crossed the plate. 
Two innings followed with successive 
outs. Maude Ludington showed unus- 
ual skill as first baseman, and a vivid 
demonsti-ation of how to slide to sec- 
ond was given by Helen Sherman. 
Martha Hanna slipped the ball 
through the seniors' field, which was 
their weakest spot, and '22 continued 
the scoring and was in the lead, 4 to 
2, at the end oi the sixth inning. The 
first half of the seventh inning 
brought in two more runs for '22. Bui 
three runs piled up for '21. Then a 
steal and a slide home tied the score 
The seventh inning closed with the 
score 6 to 6. 

A fast eighth inning proved '21's 
pitching superior to '22's and a care- 
fully placed ball (in the stall-bars; 
brought in the winning run for 1921. 

The crowd caught its breath, 
cheered the players, and relaxed to 
hear the names of the winners as 
Maude Ludington, President of A. A. 

The following girls received W's. 
1921— E. Crawford,. M. Ludington, 

H. Sherman, V. Travell. 
1922— P. Colburn, M. Durant, .H For- 
bush, S. Graffam, J. Travell. 

Varsity team was then announced: 

Helen Sherman — Pitcher 

Virginia Travell — Catcher 

Susan Graffam — 1st Base 

Maude Ludington — 2nd Base 

Martha Hanna — 3rd Base 

Elizabeth Crawford— Left Short 
Stop 



Pauline Coburn — Right Short Stop 

Janet Travell— Left Field 

Helen Forbush— Right Field 

After the requirements needed for 
possession had been explained, Vir- 
ginia Travell and Maude Ludington 
received sweaters with the old Eng- 
lish W, the highest athletic award at 
Wellesley. Eighty points are need- 
ed for this award and both recipients 
had eai'ned eighty five and one half 
points. 

The line-up for the game was as 
follows: 

1921 
H. Sherman P. 

V. Travell C. 

M. Ludington 1st B. 

M. Hesse 2nd B. 

T. Bowman 3rd B. 

M. Longaker L. S. S. 

B. Bean R. S. S. 

O. Snow L. F. 

E. Comegys R. F. 

1922 
H. Forbush P. 

J. Travell C. 

S. Graffam 1st B. 

S. Conant 2nd B. 

M. Hanna 3rd B. 

S. Leary L. S. 'S. 

P. Coburn R. S. S. 

M. Durant t L. F. 

M. Scofield R. F. 

M. N. '24 



EDITH WYNNE MATTHISONWILL 

READ FROM "ROMEO AND 

JULIET" 



Third of Reading and Speaking Series 
To Be Given In Billings Hall 



Edith Wynne Matthison (Mrs. 
Charles Rann Kennedy) will read 
from "Romeo and Juliet," Friday, 
April 29, at the third of a series of 
readings given under the auspices of 
the Reading and Speaking Depart- 
ment. 

Mrs. Kennedy is a reader of distinc- 
tive charm and dramatic attainment, 
who is always accorded an enthusi- 
astic welcome at Wellesley. 



P 



;. 



■Trro 



^ 



Hi 



JlaJJtttdA french MARRONS 

*™ O/ie dainty confection of Paris 
A tempting delicacy 
to kern in ijourroom 

In glass jars at GramkoWs ^rid Clements 

ro.i 




{or red Fashions forJwmen atyuissef. 

372-378 Boybton Street. Bojton^Wachiwetk 



JAPANESE STUDENTS 

WILL GIVE PLAYS 

FOR FUND 



"Rip Van Winkle" and "The Melon 
Thief" To Be Staged at Barn 

The Japanese girls of Wellesley 
have prepared a most engaging pro- 
gram for Saturday afternoon and eve- 
ning, April 23. They will give two 
Japanese plays in the inimitable way 
of the East — the one an interlude 
"The Melon Thief," and the other a 
dramatization of the Japanese fable 
"Rip Van Winkle." The four Japan- 
ese girls have been assisted by friends 
in Boston in making costumes and de- 
signing scenery. A Japanese com- 
poser in Boston ha s written music 
which will be played by members of 
the College Orchestra during the per- 
formance. 

The entire proceeds of both per- 
formances are to go to the Semi-Cen- 
tennial Fund. Tickets will be sold at 
the Barn door. 



CHAPEL WINDOWS 
TO BE LIGHTED 



"So Shines a Good" Suggestion 



. I W V OKK CITY 



A suggestion for lighting the chap- 
el windows which originated in the 
Free Press column of the News has 
been put into practice by Mr. Woods, 
Superintendent of Grounds who is 
experimenting on the matter. The 
idea was that the stained glass win- 
dows should be illuminated from the 
outside in such a way as to make 
their beauty evident at night. 

Mr. Woods has had some powerful 
tungsten burners placed outside the 
angel window over the freshmen tran- 
sept, but he has not found this suc- 
cessful as the lights outside and in 
seem to neutralize each other. He 
hopes in time, however, to discover a 
remedy for this difficulty, and his 
work will be watched with interest by 
the News as the fond parent of the 
idea. 



Security League Attacks New Liberal 

Club 

(Continued from page 1, col. 2) 



ing organization. However, to avoid 
misunderstanding, they openly state 
their purpose; "To promote interest 
in modern questions, to develop an in- 
formed student opinion on social, in- 
dustrial, political and international 
questions." 

As yet no anti-liberal society has 
been organized, although letters have 
been sent to both alumnae and stu- 
dents from the National Security 
League 



Wonderful 
Shoes 



FOR 



Wonderful 
Girls 




Gray Suede 
Brown Suede 
Black Satin 
Tan Russia Calf 
White Kid 

Baby Louis Heels 

In our new second floor department 
for Girls 

E. W. Burt & Co. 

32 West Street 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 





GIRDLE 



PATE NT E D 



Uhe All-Elastic Corset 



—is the Ideal Corset for College Girls 



-A- w'< 



HK TREO (ilKDLK is made entirely of porous 
woven surgical elastic web, which "gives" freely 
to every movement ot the body, vet firmly 
holds the figure. Lends grace with absolute 
comfort. Our patented method of construction 
and character of materials used make it equally 
desirable for street, dancing, evening or sport 
wear ; white or flesh tint. Price $2.00 to 5 1 5.00. 

CAUTION— The TREO GIRDLE has feature strip of elastic above 
elastic zuaist-line hand, and, therefore, supports the body above 
and below waist-line. If not at your dealer* s, write for Free Booklet. 




COMPANY, Inc. 

160-X FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 



HENRY MILLER AND BLANCHE 
BATES 

At the Hollis Street Theatre 



Rerely have a play and players rt 
d unanimous a consensus of 
approval as that extended to Henry 
Miller and Blanche Bates in their 
flawless presentation of James 
Forbes' fascinating play of American 
Mfe "The Famous Mrs. Fair," now at 
the Hollis St. Theatre, Boston. It is a 
play that has been acclaimed p.s one 
ot the best contributions ever ^rivon 
■ ir national stage literature an.] an 
I expression of good, wholesome, 
American drama with sufficient com- 
edy relief in it to justify its classifi- 
cation as a comedy-drama. 

In "The Furious Mrs. Fair" there 
no sex-rrol lems to solve, no sal- 
is inuendoes suggested, no effort 
made to arouse unsavory expecta- 
tions; it is an honestly written stor, 
of home life in a well bred American 
family, the wife of which goes with 
her unit to France and serves val- 
iantly for four years; upon h >r return 
finds that her domestic '; r( .; e re _ 
•1 lires as n.-irh reconstruction >• 
as the sector she has lefl abroad, and 
like a genuine American women, sets 
out to put her house in order. 

Boston, has endorsed the verdict of 
New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and 
-burgh by affirming that it is 
the best play written by an American 
in fifty years, and one of the best 
plays that Boston has witnessed in 
many, many years. 



Henry Miller and Blanche Bates, 
aided by the original company from 
Ilonry Miller's Theatre, New York 
City, are giving an expression of his- 
trionic artistry that is a rarity now-a- 
days, and the local press has been es- 
pecially lavish in bestowing a well 
merited appreciation of the same. 



MASS MEETING FOR "DRAKE" 



Miss Orvis Gives Account of 
Historical Background 



LIMITED NT MBER ENJOYS TEA 
DANCE GIVEN FOR THE 
BENEFIT OF THE FUND 



TRAINING COURSE FOR 

RECREATIONAL WORKERS 

OFFERED 



A Training Course for Recreational 
Workers will be held from May 2d to 
May 27th. 1921, in the Roger's Build- 
ing of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Techn< logy, Boston. The course will 
be similar to that given for two years 
by the National League of Girls 1 
Clubs in cooperation with Columbia 
University. For particulars in regard 
he Training Course, one should 
write to the National League of 
Girls' Clubs, 130 East 50th St., New 
York City. 



( small MEMORIAL EXHIBITION 

FARNSWORTH MUSEUM OF ART 

APRIL l(i THROUGH APRIL 30. 



A group of paintings in pastel by 

1-illian Haines Crittendon. 

-" presented to the Farnswo.il. 

by her husband. Mr. W 

H. Crittenden, is now on exhibition in 

euro Gallery, tot-ether with a 

examples of the artist's , 

odin the neighborhood and i„ 

heir possessors. 



The preparations for the June Play 
were launched last Friday evening, 
April 15th, when the cast, commit- 
tees and all those interested in the 
play met in Edith Wynne Matthison 
House. Miss Orvis gave a most help- 
ful lecture on the historical setting of 
the play. She gave a brief outline of 
the history of England, previous to 
Queen Elizabeth's reign: the religious 
controversy between England and 
Spain; the e'everness of the Queen 
in keeping her foreign suitors dang- 
the gradual growth of the sea 
power of England under the encourag- 
ing hand of the Queen; and the man- 
liness and strength of the man, Drake, 
who leads the. English way to victory 
over Spain. It is hoped that Mis 
Orvis will repeat this lecture in order 
thai the whole college may hear it. 
Smaill, director of the play. 

picture I Of the characters and 
the pi. hi play which will be in- 

valuable in starting the work. 

"Drake" is to be riven June 1P>th 
and 17th. 



Home ofMrs. W. H. Blood, Jr.. Opened 
Once More for Wellesley 



Among the many activities whirr. 
Mrs. W. H. Blood, Jr., has planned 
for the benefit of the fund is a s< 
of tea dances, to be given at her 
home, 147 Grove Street, Wellesley. 
every Saturday through the fourth of 
June. The first of these took place 
on Saturday afternoon, April 16. All 
those who attended enjoyed a tho- 
roughly good time, and many ex- 
pressed a desire to be present at eve- 
ry one. Some of the special attrac- 
tions of the tea dances are: a limited 
number, to insure against overcrowd- 
ing; good music; a cool garden; a 
delicious supper; and an excellent and 
pleasant way to add to the fund. Tick- 
le to be secured in advance from 
Isabel Dietrich. 243 Tower Court. 



• '■irrcction: Material for com. 
\ . Chairma: of Pub! 
must be handed in by 5 P M. on th» 
Sunday foil* wii .' the event if the 
write-up. 



ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



ill ('l'i - '22) 

Friday April 22, 1:30 P. M. 

Riding Preliminai 
be announced . 

..lis 
Friday. April 22, 7:80 P. M 
Indoor Meet . '21 
irday April 2 

. awards 

"ill be made, w . ind 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



CALENDAR 



Friday, April 22 — Orchestra Con- 
cert, Billings Hall, 8 P. M. 

Saturday, April 23 — Japanese Play, 
Barn, 2:30 P. M. and 7:30 P. M. 

Sunday, April 24 — Houghton Me- 
morial Chapel, Dr. George A. Gordo... 
of Boston., 11 A. M. 

Vesper Service, Special Music, 7:30 
P. M. 

Monday, April 25 — Baron Korff, 
Billings Hall, 7:30 P. M. Subject: 
Russia in Revolution. 

Tuesday, April 26 — Eliza Newkirk, 
Farnsworth Art Museum, Subject: 
Influence of Historic Styles on Ar- 
chitecture in Boston and Vicinity. 

Baron Korff, Room 24, Founders 
Hall, 7:30 P. M. 

Wednesday, April 27— Baron Korff. 
Room 24, Founders Hall, 4:40 P. M. 
Christian Association Meeting, Bill- 
ings Hall, Speaker: Rabbi Wise. 7:30 
P. M. 



ALUMNAE NOTES 



'19 Hilda Traxler to Herbert Erwin 
Harris, of Omaha, Nebraska. 

'79 Elizabeth Traut to Vernon H. 
Brierly, of New York City. 



MARRIED 



'16 Sarah Metzner to Arthur Boal, 
Harvard and Harvard Law School. 
April 2, 1921. 



BORN 



'14 To Ida (Appeneller) Crom, a 
son. March 28. at March Field. Calif. 



DIED 



'89 Maude Crane on August 8, 1920, 
at Naples, Italy. 

'89 Dr. Charles Alonzo Ferris, Jan- 
uary 31, only brother of Julia Ferris. 

'14 Henry Appenzeller Crom, infant 
son of Ida (Appenzeller) Crom, March 
28, at March Field, Calif. 



CHANGES OF ADDRESS 

'19 Margaret Willis to Mt. Vernou, 
Washington, after May 15. 



SHORTHAND 



THERE'S NO TIME TO GIVE LIKE 
TODAY 



Sung by Elsie Goddard, Emma Mc- 
Alamey and the Headquarters Glee 
Club, made up of members of Udetta 
Brown's Ideas Committee. 

Tune— "I Don't Want a B. A." 
Oh, we're raising a fund, 
Yes, we're raising a fund, 
And it's your contribution we need. 
Give us a hundred, give us two, 
Then approach your wealthy aunt and 

tell her what to do, 
Oh, we're raising a fund, 
Yes, we're raising a fund, 
We need both generosity and speed. 
Your husband can now show apprecia- 
tion 
By handing us as izable donation, 
Oh, we're raising a fund, 
Yes, we're raising a fund, 
And it's your contribution we need. 
O, I won't give a cent, 
Not a single little cent; 
No, it isn't the time for a drive: 
Business is dull and a body must have 

clothes. 
Where the money's coming from, 

goodness only knows. 
O, I couldn't give a cent 
For one has to pay the rent 
And for theaters and little extras too. 
You say that woman should have an 

education 
But O-O-O-I deny the allegation, 
I don't want to give a cent 
Not a single little cent 
No dear, it's a bad time to drive. 
Let me think what I can give 
Let me think what I can give 
There's no time to give like today 
I'll give up candy and walk to save 

my fare 
I will make some money washing mj 

own hair 
O, I must give every cent, 
Every tiny, squeezy cent, 
For Wellesley must come out on top, 

I know — O — 
Let's give and give and give and give 

and give for education! 
Let's abolish the Piker's Federation 
Father dear can pay the rent 
There's no time to give like today. 



CAMPUS TEA ROOM OPENS 



Great Success Assured 



CVCJTFM If dainty sanawicn es, eclairs, and 

tea can offer any inducement to half- 

IN TEN hungry girls, the Campus Tea Room 

EASY LESSONS should be an unqualified success. This 

has been the case in the short time 

I In. course covers ten easy lessons which will 

enable the Student, Professor, Journalist, Doc- since its Opening on Tuesday, April 
tor. Lawyer or anyone seeking a professional 

career, to go thru life with loo per cent effi- 12, and each day the results are bet- 

cient. 

ter. 

THIS COURSE The Tea Rcom is open on Tuesday 

Is short and inexpensive and b given with and Thursday afternoons in Room 29 

a mondy back guarantee if not satisfied. * miwmii i*^ 

SEND THIS CLIPPING TODAY of the Ad B u''ding from three to 

rYUAMin press: publishers t'wv. The moderate prices make it 

1416 Broadway, even more inviting and the only diffi- 

New York <ily 

Gentlemen:— Enclosed herewith is $5.00 for cuItv we can foresee will be the scar- 

whicfa kindly send me your shorthand course t .\f v r»f tnKloc 

in t<n easy la OIU by mail. It is understood cll -y OI laoies. 

that at the end of five days, I am not satu- rp r ,,„., t>i,«„ >oo i n/r 

(fed my money will be gladly refunded. lo Luc y Thorn.. 22, and Mary 

Hughes, '22, belong the credit for or- 

Nam « iginating the plan, and everyone must 

8tr ** t see that the project continues and 

City and State thus augment the dollars rolling into 

COLLEGE NOTE tho Endowment Fund. 



THE 
WELLESLEY NATIONAL BANK 

WELLESLEY, MASS. 

The faculty and students of Wellesley College are 
invited to avail themselves of the privileges and services 
offered by this Bank, and the officers and employees are 
ever ready to render any assistance possible in connection 
with banking matters. 

C. N. TAYLOR, President BENJ. H. SANBORN, V.-President 

LOUIS HARVEY, Cashier 
Savings Department Safe Deposit Boxes 




FRANK BROTHERS 

Fifth Avenue Boot Shop 

Near Forty-Eighth Street, New York 

Boots, Slippers, Hosiery for Men, 

Women and Children 



BOSTON 



CHICAGO 
Michigan Blvd. Bids, 
corner Washington St. 

ST. LOUIS 
Arcade Building 



NEW HAVEN 

Hotel Taf t 

PITTSBURGH 

Jenkins Arcade 

CLEVELAND 

Athletic Club Building 



Tremont and Boylston St*. 
Little Building 

WASHINGTON 

Woodward Building 

opp. Shoreham Hotel 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Whitney Building 

133 Geary Street 



zJ'w- fro 



vomem, 



Summer and Winter Terms. Limited Registration. 
4 Brattle Street, - - Cambridge, Massachusetts. 




STUDENT SUPPLIES 

TYPEWRITING PAPER 

ENGRAVING AND PRINTING 

BLANK BOOKS AND LOOSE 
LEAF DEVICES 
(all sizes) 
A LINE A DAY BOOK 
LEATHER GOODS 
FOUNTAIN PENS 
FINE PAPER AND ENVEL- 
OPES 
57-61 FRANKLIN ST., BOST'N 



VISIT THE 

The Yarn Shop 



at its 



New Quarters 
Waban Block 

GOOD SHEPHERD YARNS 
ANGO FLEECE